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Tuesday, 1 April 2014

HOODOO VOODOO MASTER VOODOO HOODOO MASTER





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HOODOO VOODOO MASTER
VOODOO HOODOO MASTER






Differences between voodoo and hoodoo[edit]

Like voodoo, hoodoo shows evident links to the practices and beliefs of West African spiritual folkways. The ancient African folkway of Vodun is a more standardized and widely dispersed spiritual practice than hoodoo. Vodun's modern form is practiced across West Africa in the countries now known as BeninTogo, and Burkina Faso, among others. InHaitiCuba, and other Caribbean islands, the worship of the Vodoun gods (called lwa or loas) is practiced in a syncretic form that has been greatly modified by contact withCatholicism. The Voodoo of Haiti and Louisiana Voodoo are related more to Vodun than to hoodoo; similar Vodun practices among Spanish speakers in Cuba are called SanterĂ­a.
However, a more precise description of what Voodoo is and how it relates to both Vodun and to Hoodoo is needed.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoodoo_(folk_magic)#Differences_between_voodoo_and_hoodoo




John CanoeJohn Koonah, or John Kooner is a ritual once common in coastal North Carolina and still practiced in the Caribbean in islands that are or were part of the British West Indies, particularly Jamaica. It is thought to be of African origin.
Historian Stephen Nissenbaum described the ritual as it was performed in 19th-century North Carolina:
Essentially, it involved a band of black men–generally young–who dressed themselves in ornate and often bizarre costumes. Each band was led by a man who was variously dressed in animal horns, elaborate rags, female disguisewhiteface (and wearing a gentleman's wig!), or simply his "Sunday-go-to-meeting-suit." Accompanied by music, the band marched along the roads from plantation to plantation, town to town, accosting whites along the way and sometimes even entering their houses. In the process the men performed elaborate and (to white observers) grotesque dances that were probably of African origin. And in return for this performance they always demanded money (the leader generally carried "a small bowl or tin cup" for this purpose), though whiskey was an acceptable substitute. (Nissenbaum 1997, 285)
Nissenbaum likened John Canoe to the wassailing tradition of medieval Britain, seeing in both a ritualized inversion of the established social hierarchy that provides, simultaneously, a temporary suspension and powerful reaffirmation of that hierarchy. Wassailing performed this inversion along the axis of social class, whereas the 19th-century American version of John Canoe performed it along the axis of race. Both John Canoe and wassailing bear strong resemblance to the social inversion rituals that marked the ancient Roman celebration ofSaturnalia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Canoe

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The Times
March 22, 2006
Safe and insecure
By Martin Waller

"THREE e-mails scatter-gunned to corporate bodies arrive from the so-called “Race Equality Inspectorate”. They say: “Please report any incidences of Institutional Racism to us.” An ambulance-chasing lawyer, perhaps? No, a self-appointed, selfimportant pressure group."









The TOP SECRET rise to POWER of the most powerful Black leader this White Supremacist world has ever known.











 
 
"In time, you will call me master"


















RACIAL BANKING IS SAFE BANKING

THE HOLY BOOK
OF
RACIAL GOVERNMENT









Source: http://www.education.gov.uk/escs-isb/standardslibrary/a0077051/ethnicity-data-standard



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